NATIONAL BANKS.

There are now twenty-five national banks, having a gross capital of $22,726,100. Six are in Tōkiō, the others in the large inland cities. They are named "First," "Second," etc.

A.D. 1878, ELEVENTH YEAR OF MEIJI AND 2538TH OF THE JAPANTESE EMPIRE. FIRES IN Tōkiō.

Old Yedo was notorious for its fires, which were called "The Flowers of Yedo," at least one of which was said to occur every night. The entire area of the city, it was computed, was burned over once in every seven years. Fires consuming thousands of houses were frequent. Since 1872 (p. 563) fires are less numerous in Tōkiō, and are greatly curtailed in their ravages, owing to the change of style of architecture and building material. The reigning mikado - the Augustus of Japan - found Yedo wood; he will leave Tōkiō stone.

NATIONAL FINANCES.

According to the Nichi-nichi Shimbun (Daily News) of Tōkiō - the official organ - the national debt of Japan amounts now to $349,826,662, classified as follows: paper money in circulation, $121,054,731; foreign loan bearing nine per cent. interest, $2,440,000; foreign loan bearing seven per cent. interest, $10,959,016; special loan for defraying expenses consequent upon the Satsuma rebellion.

$15,000,000. The remaining items are Government bonds for the exchange of rice-pensions, money incomes, etc., of the samurai, and bearing interest from naught to four, five, six, seven, eight, and ten per cent.